University of Michigan, US

Gary D. Glick obtained his Ph.D. from Columbia University in 1988 studying organic chemistry under the direction of W. Clark Still. After completing a National Institutes of Health postdoctoral fellowship at Harvard University in 1990 with Jeremy R. Knowles, Dr. Glick joined the chemistry faculty at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, where he presently holds the Werner E. Bachmann chair and is a professor in the Department of Biological Chemistry at the University of Michigan Medical School.  During his tenure at Michigan, Dr. Glick founded the Chemical Biology Doctoral Program, served on numerous local and national boards and committees, and is currently Editor-in-Chief of Biopolymers, a leading journal publishing in the areas of biochemistry and biophysics.

Dr. Glick is also the founder of Lycera Corp, a bio-pharmaceutical company developing small molecule drugs for autoimmune diseases and cancer.  As the founder of Lycera, Dr. Glick recruited a team of over 20 chemists, immunologists, and physician-scientists and in 2009, raised $39 M in equity financing to support the company.  Under his direction and leadership as Chief Science Officer, the company established six innovative, first-in-class drug discovery programs, partnered two of these programs with Merck and Co, established the company’s immuno-oncology platform, and advanced LYC-30937, a modulator of the mitochondrial ATPase based on research from his academic lab, into clinical trials for colitis.

Dr. Glick’s scientific contributions have been recognized with a number of different awards including, an Arthritis Investigator Award from the National Arthritis Foundation, a Junior Faculty Research Award from the American Cancer Society, a Young Investigator Award from the National Science Foundation, a Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award, a Research Fellowship from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation and he is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Speaker at
8-10 SEPTEMBER 2015, Leuven, Belgium