University of Toronto, CA

I first discovered the beauty and elegance of phages during my Ph.D. studies, which were focused on the DNA packaging enzyme of E. coli phage lambda. During my post-doctoral work at MIT, I switched to the field of protein structure and folding. My laboratory at the University of Toronto has operated since 1995. Our work has covered the areas of protein folding, protein-protein interactions, structural biology, and phage biology. My research is currently focused solely on phages. We study how phages work, and how we can exploit phage-derived entities for applications in human health.  We also study anti-CRISPRs, which are phage-encoded inhibitors of CRISPR-Cas systems. We discovered these proteins, and are currently endeavouring to understand how they work, and how they can be exploited in genome editing application. My group combines expertise in phage biology, structural biology, in vitro biochemistry, and bioinformatics, allowing us to address questions through a multi-disciplinary approach.

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Speaker at
25-26 January 2018, Bruges, Belgium